American, Millenial, Whovian, art historian (kinda). I love Jesus, YouTube, and you. I enjoy me some music, culture, laughter, and linguistics among lots of other random stuff.

About Me
I reblog stuff from these people...
Posts tagged "racism"

karnythia:

Children of color are old enough to face racism when they’re born. Old enough to bear the weight of stereotypes & hate before their little eyes can focus. But somehow white kids are supposed to be too delicate & too shielded to even know race exists because somehow that might hurt them. When your definition of innocent child doesn’t include my babies? I know what you’re on & I don’t have any patience for the lies you tell yourself or your children.

True story: my skin was so light that my early medical records say my race is “white.” However when my white grandmother’s now ex-husband took one look at me as a newborn he said “never bring THAT in my house again.” When I was told this story as an adult, my white stepdad tried to ease the pain by saying “he didn’t hate you, he gated your skin.” As well-intentioned as that was, I know that’s not true. The old man hated my culture. This is what bothers me when people act like racism isn’t a problem. That incident happened in my generation, the generation of a millennial. It’s not in the distant past. That man is still alive, and my mother has yet to forgive.

(via milesjai)

I have white guy friends that say the N word all the time. I don't approve of it and I don't say it myself but this doesn't make them bad people. Justin was 16 when he said that. We all say stupid stuff that we dont understand when we're young.
sierra830 sierra830 Said:

gunnarolla:

I agree that we all say and do stupid stuff when we’re young and that we don’t necessarily understand the consequences of our words and actions. I am all for giving people a second chance - especially if they are coming from a place of ignorance, especially if they are child stars that were plucked out of their small white conservative towns and didn’t have a chance to have a real education. Justin Bieber is clearly going through a strange time in his life and I genuinely hope that he can get his life back on track.

But here’s the thing about racial slurs - it’s not up to us to decide whether or not they’re hurtful. And with regards to the N-word, it will never be up to white people to decide how and when that word can be used. Maybe the N-word, to your “white guy friends”, isn’t a big deal. And maybe they feel that they can casually drop it in conversation “all the time” without thinking twice about it. But it’s really ignorant and destructive to overlook the history and weight behind these terms. Just because they don’t hurt you, does not mean that they aren’t hurtful.

If you don’t approve of it, and if you know why it’s wrong, you have a responsibility to call your friends out. Help them learn and help them to understand why it’s not ok to say these things. Do you know anything about discrimination? Oppression? Rape? Slavery? Lynchings? Murder? Understand history and show some respect.

Justin Bieber has apologized for his remarks. Is that enough? I don’t know. It’s not up to me to decide. But I think that it’s the least we can expect and it’s hopefully the first step toward clearing up this mess. I’m sure we’ll all be keeping a close eye on his words and actions now that he’s an adult and won’t have the excuse of saying “stupid stuff that we don’t understand when we’re young”.

Very well said. I couldn’t put it better myself. *slow clap into standing ovation*

skullvomit:

googooshftbollywoodandkpop:

versaria:

haramgirls:

indigenousdialogues:

Iranian artist, Leila Pazooki Moment of Glory Neon light installation Dimensions variable 2010 Courtesy Leila Heller Gallery


#tru bc no matter we produce or achieve we’re defined in relation to whiteness or the global north

Very important

Whoa

As an art history major who recently had to go through article after article on colonialism as exhibition, and being a “non-white” person who has yet to meet a non-Caucasian person in my field of study, this gives me so many feels.

skullvomit:

googooshftbollywoodandkpop:

versaria:

haramgirls:

indigenousdialogues:

Iranian artist, Leila Pazooki
Moment of Glory
Neon light installation
Dimensions variable
2010
Courtesy Leila Heller Gallery

#tru bc no matter we produce or achieve we’re defined in relation to whiteness or the global north

Very important

Whoa

As an art history major who recently had to go through article after article on colonialism as exhibition, and being a “non-white” person who has yet to meet a non-Caucasian person in my field of study, this gives me so many feels.

(via entirelysayali)

Am I the only one that’s been bothered by the segregated McDonalds commercials?

sararye:

assbutt-in-the-garrison:

rebelliouslittlemockingjay:

some awesome signs outside the Supreme Court

May I just please direct your attention to the facial expression of the girl in the middle last picture? It’s quite amazing.

not long ago our marriage was illegal 

if that doesn’t put shit in perspective then what does

I’m kind of surprised at how this particular post just struck me emotionally. I’ve seen/heard these arguments made before. Perhaps it was because scrolling through the pictures one by one I saw the last one and was reminded of my mom and dad. They never married (they’re good friends now), but they had to face  occasional hateful things said to them and at least on one occasion at me as a newborn… and they heard it from people in their families. That was only 23 years ago. As a Christian, seeing people in my Christian “family” say hurtful things - I cannot even imagine how much more it would hurt if I was gay too. 

Just a thought.

(via quantumsiren)

nicolebyer:

khealywu:

zillah975:

femmeforeverybody:

Nichelle Nichols (Uhura on the original series):”Whoopi Goldberg, she’s just marvellous. I had no way of knowing that she was a Star Trek fan. When I finally met her it was her first year on the Next Generation.

She loved the show so much and she told her agent she wants a role on Star Trek. Well agents go ‘Big screen, little screen, no, you can’t do that’. Well you can’t tell Whoopi ‘You can’t do that’.

And so they finally asked, and they had the same reaction at Star Trek office, specifically Gene. And she said, ‘I want to meet him and I want him to tell me to my face. If he tells me he doesn’t want me and why, I’ll be fine.’

Knowing Gene he had to take that challenge, and so he met with her. She said, ‘I just wanted you to tell me why you don’t want me in Star Trek.’

Gene said, ‘Well, I’ll just ask you one question and I’ll make my decision on that. You’re a big screen star, why do you want to be on a little screen, why do you want to be in Star Trek?’

And she looked at him and she said, ‘Well, it’s all Nichelle Nichols’ fault.’

That threw him, he said, ‘What do you mean?’

She said, ‘Well when I was nine years old Star Trek came on,’ and she said, ‘I looked at it and I went screaming through the house, “Come here, mum, everybody, come quick, come quick, there’s a black lady on television and she ain’t no maid!”’ And she said, ‘I knew right then and there I could be anything I wanted to be, and I want to be on Star Trek.’

And he said, ‘I’ll write you a role.’

http://www.bbc.co.uk/cult/st/interviews/nichols/page4.shtml

I know I’ve reblogged this before, and I will undoubtedly do it again.

It matters. And no amount of saying that we’re post-racial or that racism isn’t a thing or that “they just chose the best actor for the role” or otherwise trying to cover up for it will make it okay to keep relegating actors of color to secondary roles, villain roles, stereotyped roles, or no roles at all, and it sure as hell won’t make it okay to keep whitewashing CHARACTERS of color out of the story by casting white actors to play then.

Remember how Martin Luther King Jr. convinced Nichelle Nichols to stay on the show? 

I said “Dr. King, thank you so much. I really am going to miss my co-stars.” He said, dead serious, “What are you talking about?” I said, “I’m leaving Star Trek,” He said, “You cannot. You cannot!”

I was taken aback. He said, “Don’t you understand what this man has achieved? For the first time on television we will be seen as we should be seen every day – as intelligent, quality, beautiful people who can sing, dance, but who can also go into space, who can be lawyers, who can be teachers, who can be professors, and yet you don’t see it on television – until now….”

I could say nothing, I just stood there realizing every word that he was saying was the truth. He said, “Gene Roddenberry has opened a door for the world to see us. If you leave, that door can be closed because, you see, your role is not a Black role, and it’s not a female role, he can fill it with anything, including an alien.”

At that moment, the world tilted for me. I knew then that I was something else and that the world was not the same. That’s all I could think of, everything that Dr. King had said:  The world sees us for the first time as we should be seen.

It matters, man. It honestly does. It mattered then and it still matters.

It. Matters.

This.

I had a similar reaction to seeing Alicia Keys on TV for the first time when I was around 10 years old. It really confirmed that I could do anything.

(via gunnarolla)

dong-cassette:

-lunatic:

this is usually my reaction to fried chicken as well

And people say it’s only black people who get excited over fried chicken

We’re not alone after all.

(via rangoontycoon)

sierra830:

The above photo is of a handwritten letter to President Obama from my youngest sister, Lyric. (With corrected spelling and details omitted/blurred) it reads:
Dear Mr. President, if I was old enough I would vote for you. I am 8 years old. My name is Lyric. I read a book about you in school. When I grow up I am going to be a president just like you. I am proud of you. You are an idol to me because I have a white mom and a black dad just like you. You are a really nice guy. In school I read facts about you. You should be president again. Please write back. Yes we can!! :)
Thank you for your time, Lyric.
Lately the race for president has been getting especially catty and rude. If anyone happens to mention the name of a candidate, someone in opposition immediately has to throw in their two cents, because everybody seems to know exactly how the country is supposed to be fixed correctly in their minds. Now whether you’re a Democrat, Republican, or neither, I think this letter can serve as a reminder to all of us about the bigger picture. An 8-year-old little girl, my baby sister, can now feasibly see herself as President of the United States because our president is ‘just like her.’ Even if President Obama does not serve a second term, we should remember to be grateful for the positive things he did for this country by being President. (We cannot change the fact that he has been serving for the past few years, and even if some didn’t want it, that is what the people decided 4 years ago.) I distinctly remember the first time I saw someone who I thought was just like me on television and thinking to myself that I really could be whatever I wanted. It was an inspiring confirmation for me and my family, and I’m grateful that President Obama could be that for my little sister. Thank you, Mr. President for being an inspiration to Lyric, and millions of other young and not-so-young people across the world.
- Sincerely,
Sierra (aka Lyric’s oldest sister)

**UPDATE**
The President wrote my baby sister back, and she cried tears of joy. Her mom is going to frame the letter from President Obama to display in their house. I appreciate that he took the time to respond in the midst of all the campaigning chaos. When all is said and done, and the election is over, no matter the result, I’m thankful that him being elected in 2008 was able to inspire my little sister to dream big, and I’m equally thankful that he encouraged her to continue do so. (Sorry, that last sentence got a bit long.)
Thank you again, Mr. President.

sierra830:

The above photo is of a handwritten letter to President Obama from my youngest sister, Lyric. (With corrected spelling and details omitted/blurred) it reads:

Dear Mr. President, if I was old enough I would vote for you. I am 8 years old. My name is Lyric. I read a book about you in school. When I grow up I am going to be a president just like you. I am proud of you. You are an idol to me because I have a white mom and a black dad just like you. You are a really nice guy. In school I read facts about you. You should be president again. Please write back. Yes we can!! :)

Thank you for your time, Lyric.


Lately the race for president has been getting especially catty and rude. If anyone happens to mention the name of a candidate, someone in opposition immediately has to throw in their two cents, because everybody seems to know exactly how the country is supposed to be fixed correctly in their minds. Now whether you’re a Democrat, Republican, or neither, I think this letter can serve as a reminder to all of us about the bigger picture. An 8-year-old little girl, my baby sister, can now feasibly see herself as President of the United States because our president is ‘just like her.’ Even if President Obama does not serve a second term, we should remember to be grateful for the positive things he did for this country by being President. (We cannot change the fact that he has been serving for the past few years, and even if some didn’t want it, that is what the people decided 4 years ago.) I distinctly remember the first time I saw someone who I thought was just like me on television and thinking to myself that I really could be whatever I wanted. It was an inspiring confirmation for me and my family, and I’m grateful that President Obama could be that for my little sister. Thank you, Mr. President for being an inspiration to Lyric, and millions of other young and not-so-young people across the world.

- Sincerely,

Sierra (aka Lyric’s oldest sister)

**UPDATE**

The President wrote my baby sister back, and she cried tears of joy. Her mom is going to frame the letter from President Obama to display in their house. I appreciate that he took the time to respond in the midst of all the campaigning chaos. When all is said and done, and the election is over, no matter the result, I’m thankful that him being elected in 2008 was able to inspire my little sister to dream big, and I’m equally thankful that he encouraged her to continue do so. (Sorry, that last sentence got a bit long.)

Thank you again, Mr. President.

The above photo is of a handwritten letter to President Obama from my youngest sister, Lyric. (With corrected spelling and details omitted/blurred) it reads:
Dear Mr. President, if I was old enough I would vote for you. I am 8 years old. My name is Lyric. I read a book about you in school. When I grow up I am going to be a president just like you. I am proud of you. You are an idol to me because I have a white mom and a black dad just like you. You are a really nice guy. In school I read facts about you. You should be president again. Please write back. Yes we can!! :)
Thank you for your time, Lyric.
Lately the race for president has been getting especially catty and rude. If anyone happens to mention the name of a candidate, someone in opposition immediately has to throw in their two cents, because everybody seems to know exactly how the country is supposed to be fixed correctly in their minds. Now whether you’re a Democrat, Republican, or neither, I think this letter can serve as a reminder to all of us about the bigger picture. An 8-year-old little girl, my baby sister, can now feasibly see herself as President of the United States because our president is ‘just like her.’ Even if President Obama does not serve a second term, we should remember to be grateful for the positive things he did for this country by being President. (We cannot change the fact that he has been serving for the past few years, and even if some didn’t want it, that is what the people decided 4 years ago.) I distinctly remember the first time I saw someone who I thought was just like me on television and thinking to myself that I really could be whatever I wanted. It was an inspiring confirmation for me and my family, and I’m grateful that President Obama could be that for my little sister. Thank you, Mr. President for being an inspiration to Lyric, and millions of other young and not-so-young people across the world.
- Sincerely,
Sierra (aka Lyric’s oldest sister)

The above photo is of a handwritten letter to President Obama from my youngest sister, Lyric. (With corrected spelling and details omitted/blurred) it reads:

Dear Mr. President, if I was old enough I would vote for you. I am 8 years old. My name is Lyric. I read a book about you in school. When I grow up I am going to be a president just like you. I am proud of you. You are an idol to me because I have a white mom and a black dad just like you. You are a really nice guy. In school I read facts about you. You should be president again. Please write back. Yes we can!! :)

Thank you for your time, Lyric.


Lately the race for president has been getting especially catty and rude. If anyone happens to mention the name of a candidate, someone in opposition immediately has to throw in their two cents, because everybody seems to know exactly how the country is supposed to be fixed correctly in their minds. Now whether you’re a Democrat, Republican, or neither, I think this letter can serve as a reminder to all of us about the bigger picture. An 8-year-old little girl, my baby sister, can now feasibly see herself as President of the United States because our president is ‘just like her.’ Even if President Obama does not serve a second term, we should remember to be grateful for the positive things he did for this country by being President. (We cannot change the fact that he has been serving for the past few years, and even if some didn’t want it, that is what the people decided 4 years ago.) I distinctly remember the first time I saw someone who I thought was just like me on television and thinking to myself that I really could be whatever I wanted. It was an inspiring confirmation for me and my family, and I’m grateful that President Obama could be that for my little sister. Thank you, Mr. President for being an inspiration to Lyric, and millions of other young and not-so-young people across the world.

- Sincerely,

Sierra (aka Lyric’s oldest sister)

reginasworld:

Recently The Gordon Parks Foundation discovered over 70 unpublished photographs by Parks at the bottom of an old storage box wrapped in paper and marked as “Segregation Series.” These never before series of images not only give us a glimpse into the everyday life of African Americans during the 50′s but are also in full color, something that is uncommon for photographs from that era.

More images here

(via iansgallaghers)

confessyourkpop:

The rumors about Caucasian people in KPOP groups…..

IF those are really true…

I came into KPOP because of the KOREAN people. 

I wanted to see KOREANS! ASIANS! 

I think Koreans/ASIANS are so beautful! Maybe it’s because I’m

a Caucasian in the US and I’m tired of seeing my own 

kind everywhere; TV, stores, ETC. It’s nice seeing 

something different you know? I don’t want a “Justin Bieber”

to be part of a KPOP group…..It just wouldn’t look right….

….As immature as I may sound….

….KPOP is KOREAN POP….

Having Chinese, Japanese, Thai members are fine but Caucasian? o.O

Sorry, it won’t do for me….

**WARNING - RANT AHEAD**

To me this sounds like “Oh I’m so sick of being treated well and seeing people like me being acknowledged for their talent and being seen as beautiful all the time.”

Seriously?

Still at my age in America I can think of only one celebrity that looked like my “race” on mainstream television, and I can vividly remember the day I first saw her and how me and my family felt. I remember feeling like I really could be or do anything I wanted to no matter what it was. Although I felt positive towards the idea of doing what I wanted, seeing her on TV really cemented that any dream I had could become whatever I wanted. If you’re sick of seeing white people all the time, move somewhere that doesn’t have a Caucasian majority. K-Pop is Korean Pop because the language of the music is primarily Korean and the music is made in Korea. Saying that Caucasians can’t make Korean music because they’re white is like saying Asians/Asian-Americans can’t make American pop because they’re not white or black - which is exactly why some Americans and Canadians of Asian descent are leaving for Korea to become pop stars in the first place.

You are disrespectful to all Southerners and the Confederate dead when you declare that the Second Navy Jack is a symbol of racism.
sierra830 sierra830 Said:

Look, I understand that the Southern confederates had other things they were fighting for other than slavery, but that’s not just some small aspect that can be ignored.

Also, not all Southerners tote around the Second Navy Jack and I don’t think all Southerners or even most Southerners are racist. There are other ways to show pride for the south that have less negative aspects of our nation’s history attached to it.

When I see the Confederate flag, I’m reminded of the fact that over a four year period over half a million U.S. soldiers died as brothers literally fought against each other to the death, and many of those Confederates died to protect the right to own my ancestors as property listed directly above horses and cows in their ledgers. To me, that is racist.

Day 2 : Write whatever it is in your head right now.

I just got off the phone with my good friend Katie, asking her what her plans were for tonight since I have an extra ticket to The Avengers. She said she was heading to Bloomington to see the movie while her brother does some recording for his new album, and told me to text her after the movie was over. She then proceeds with -
Her: "Oh yeah, I was about to text you. I think your half Korean."

Me: "Huh?"


Her: "Yeah, I’ve been thinking about it, and you know those pictures of half Korean babies? Your baby picture looks like that. So I’m saying your half Korean. I’m pretty sure about this."

Me: "Um, Ok."
I guess I’ll just add that to the list then. 
I have an ever-growing list of ethnicities that people inaccurately assume me to be or think I may actually be, despite the fact that my ethnic background is known to be Scots-Irish, English, German, African-American, Cherokee, and Blackfoot. So far the list includes:
  • Egyptian
  • Hawaiian/Polynesian
  • Japanese
  • Mongolian
  • Chinese
  • Puerto Rican
  • Korean
  • Mexican
Thus I have concluded that when people wonder what it is I am, the answer is simple: I’m beige.

50 Day Challenge of Random Things - Day 1: A picture of something you hate.

The Confederate flag.

I don’t care what you’re excuse is and I don’t want to hear about how it represents something other than slavery. I’ve heard it plenty of times before. If you want more power on a state level rather than a federal level, you can do so without parading around with a symbol so strongly connected with hatred, specifically racism and slavery. 

antifascistaction:

racists can’t rock

(via thegermansmakegoodstuff)